We all love caddies -; but there’s a price to pay

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We all love caddies -; but there’s a price to pay
We all love caddies -; but there’s a price to pay

“At the moment I only play golf every few weeks although I would really enjoy playing much more often. There’s only one reason why I don’t play weekly – cost. One of the big reasons for the high cost of golf in Thailand is compulsory caddies. In many countries around the world, including my home country, a caddie is not even available (unless I arrange my own), let alone compulsory. Here the cost a round of golf is significantly increased because I must pay for a caddie as well as a caddie tip. This means I must pay an extra 800 THB or so – per round!

Don’t get me wrong, I love playing with a caddie in Thailand. Apart from on-course assistance, they have a great sense of humour and it helps to improve my Thai; but it’s a luxury I can’t always afford. I also get it that caddie employment has a significant impact on community incomes, but should that be the responsibility of golfers? I wonder what would be the take-up of golfers paying for a caddie if an ‘opt-out’ option was available. OK that’s my rant; I just a hope that golf course management think about attracting more players with fewer caddies!” A local ‘Cheap Charlie’ From the Editor: The point is well made and open for debate but don’t expect any changes soon.

The comments of golfers and managers are welcome. Public Transport around Cha-Am Songthaews forbidden in Cha-Am? “ I’ve been to many holiday places in Thailand, but Cha-Am is one of the only places where there is no public transport to get around the town or the beach area other than on the back of a motorbike taxi.

Most places, including Hua Hin, have a songthaew on a regular route or even a tuk-tuk, so that family members or groups of friends can get from the railway station or from one end of the beach to the other, but not in Cha-Am. Tourists with young children can’t be expected to get a ride on the back of a motorbike taxi. Locals say this is because the motorbike taxi operators control what’s possible and the municipality can’t change this situation;

I think that’s ridiculous. If Cha-Am really wants more tourists; a way needs to be found to arrange safe and convenient local transport; I hope you can help. Wenche (from Norway“At the moment I only play golf every few weeks although I would really enjoy playing much more often. There’s only one reason why I don’t play weekly – cost.

One of the big reasons for the high cost of golf in Thailand is compulsory caddies. In many countries around the world, including my home country, a caddie is not even available (unless I arrange my own), let alone compulsory. Here the cost a round of golf is significantly increased because I must pay for a caddie as well as a caddie tip. This means I must pay an extra 800 THB or so – per round! Don’t get me wrong, I love playing with a caddie in Thailand. Apart from on-course assistance, they have a great sense of humour and it helps to improve my Thai; but it’s a luxury I can’t always afford. I also get it that caddie employment has a significant impact on community incomes, but should that be the responsibility of golfers? I wonder what would be the take-up of golfers paying for a caddie if an ‘opt-out’ option was available. OK that’s my rant; I just a hope that golf course management think about attracting more players with fewer caddies!” A local ‘Cheap Charlie’ From the Editor: The point is well made and open for debate but don’t expect any changes soon. The comments of golfers and managers are welcome. Public Transport around Cha-Am Songthaews forbidden in Cha-Am? “

I’ve been to many holiday places in Thailand, but Cha-Am is one of the only places where there is no public transport to get around the town or the beach area other than on the back of a motorbike taxi. Most places, including Hua Hin, have a songthaew on a regular route or even a tuk-tuk, so that family members or groups of friends can get from the railway station or from one end of the beach to the other, but not in Cha-Am. Tourists with young children can’t be expected to get a ride on the back of a motorbike taxi. Locals say this is because the motorbike taxi operators control what’s possible and the municipality can’t change this situation; I think that’s ridiculous.

If Cha-Am really wants more tourists; a way needs to be found to arrange safe and convenient local transport; I hope you can help. Wenche (from Norway)

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